Home >  Gallery > Blog >  Dropout rate remains high among girls in Delhi

Dropout rate remains high among girls in Delhi

Government schemes and programmes designed to help girls continue in school aren't working. At the primary level, the number of girls per 1,000 boys has fallen from 881 in 2010-11 to 867 in 2013-14. At the secondary school level, it has fallen from 859 in 2010-11 to 840 in 2013-14. Only scheduled caste (SC) students have a healthy ratio—in the 900s or even more than 1,000—at middle, secondary and senior-secondary levels.

R Govinda, vice-chancellor, National University for Educational Planning and Administration (NUEPA), however, doesn't see it as a failure of government schemes and policies, or even a long-term trend. He says enrolment at the primary level increased tremendously after Right to Education Act was implemented in 2010. "It'll take a few years for that change to show up in the statistics."

Govinda says more girls than boys drop out after finishing primary and middle levels, but those who enter secondary school usually stay on till the end. That isn't the case with boys, which may explain the increase in sex ratio from secondary to senior-secondary. In 2010-11 the sex ratio was 859 at secondary level and 881 at senior-secondary level; in 2013-14, it declined to 840 at the secondary level but increased to 896 at the senior-secondary level. This is not because of greater participation of girls but because boys have started dropping out by this stage.

"In Delhi, boys start dropping out when they move from municipal to government schools," says Saurabh Sharma of Josh, a city NGO that is also part of the Right to Education Forum. "For five feeder municipal schools, there will be one government school. In that crowding, boys find it very difficult to survive. They may get out and start working." He says the problem is shortage of schools, not resistance from parents. He disagrees with Govinda on the effectiveness of government schemes. "Most parents don't even know how to apply for Ladli. There's no one to tell them what to do. People have no faith in schemes," says Sharma.

Why do SC students have a better sex ratio? Sharma can't explain that one. "Does this mean SC parents are more aware? I don't think so." Govinda says it could be because SC boys and SC girls drop out equally. The figures bear this out but only for 2010-11 when 12,747 boys and 13,836 girls transitioned to senior-secondary from 17,188 boys and 17,650 girls who were in Class X, and the sex ratio remained over 1,000. In 2012-13, the number of SC students increased from 77,470 in secondary to 81,853 in senior-secondary.

Source : TOI

About the Author: Mr. Avinash Jain

Better not be greedy, as it is the death before death

Mr. Avinash Jain (Managing Director, Arise India Ltd) has been awarded 'Pride of the Country' and 'Bharat Ratna Human Rights' awards. He has made it his life's mission to improve the conditions of young orphaned children using his initiatives in Sangam.